News | May 29, 2014

Revolution In Sewage Mining Arrives To Hungary: Applied CleanTech Automatically Recovers Cellulosic Waste From Waste Water

LONDON--(BUSINESS WIRE)--

Applied CleanTech (http://www.appliedcleantech.com/) this week signed a franchise agreement with Hungarian company Szennyviz ujrahasznosito Kft, for the establishment of an SRS system in wastewater treatment facilities in Hungary. The first system will arrive in Hungary in October. The wastewater treatment sector in Hungary turns over approximately a hundred million euros a year, with the value of this transaction estimated at approximately €10.5 million over the next five years. The systems to be installed by Applied CleanTech (already in operation in Mexico, Scotland, the Netherlands and Israel) will manufacture cellulose from local waste water.

Using new technology, the system enables a significant reduction in energy consumed by wastewater treatment facilities, reduces sludge volumes, minimizes greenhouse gas emissions and recycles sewage into Recyllose™ – a raw material for the plastics and paper industries. The technology is implemented by an efficient, automated facility, which recycles cellulosic waste for use as energy, paper, nanocellulose and plastic products (called the SRS – Sewage Recycling System). At the end of the process, waste solids are transformed into clean, environmentally-friendly raw materials with high energy potential, which makes the treatment facility a manufacturer of green energy and increases its processing capacity by 30%. The Company's business model enables customers to purchase the machine with all functions included, or enjoy long-term operation and service.

Dr. Refael Aharon, CEO and founder of Applied CleanTech: "The future of wastewater treatment is to enable an economy to be based on recycling valuable materials from wastewater." Today, the Company is in advanced negotiations with additional countries to establish more projects of this kind worldwide.

The unique development was designed to provide a solution to the problem of sewage treatment on the one hand, and deliver high quality raw materials for local consumption on the other, all while reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Next month, the first installation of its kind will be performed also in Canada.


Copyright Business Wire 2014

Newsletter Signup
Get the latest industry news, insights, and analysis delivered to your inbox.
Join your peers